Contact

General Priory:

Order of Engaged Buddhists
Rev. David Shen-Xi Astor, Sensei
Sebring, Fl. 33872

General Priory Phone:

443-994-3551 (+1 for international calls)

Skype: david.astor (by appointment)

Email:

General Prior’s Office: orderengagedbuddhists@gmail.com

Director of Vocations: oebvocationdir@gmail.com

New York Chapter House:

Order of Engaged Buddhists

Rev. Dr. Shen-Jin Kenna (Resident Priest)

Shirley, NY 11967 (Long Island Sangha)

Phone: 631-552-7837

Belgium Chapter House:

Rev. Shi Yao-Xin (Luis Lista), Sensei (Resident Priest)

Rue de l’industrie, 5

5002 Saint-Servais

Namur Belguim

Phone: 0032487016749

Affiliate Groups:

epiphany Zen center
Ganryoku-ji
Sebring, Florida

 

Flowing River Ch’an Group
Long Island, New York
631-552-7837

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5 responses to “Contact

  1. Rico

    I have vacillated back and forth between Christianity (Protestant, Catholic, Orthodox) and Zen or other simple Buddhist meditation practice forms. Honestly, at 66, I am tired of complex and complicated systems of thought. I have worked with the poorest of the poor in Kingston, Jamaica, I love LIFE, and I love to help others. I want to find truth and I honestly cannot say Christianity is the truth although it seems to have more answers to life than other systems. It requires, however, too many cognitive dissonant agreements. What is the simplest form of Buddhism you recommend to me? I like to meditate and read one chapter of the Dhammapada per day. That’s about it. Presently illusion, non-duality, amorality, no soul, and no god, make no sense to me. But, not really knowing all the answers, Buddhism seems to fit me better than Christianity and the non-intervening God. What do you suggest? Let me know. Rico, loseguo@yahoo.com. Thank you.

    • Rico, thank you for taking the time to comment, and visiting our website. Your qiestions are very good and reflects what all of us have gone through in the beginning when we develop an interest in Buddhist thought. If you read the page that gives a brief background of our leadership you will know I came to Buddhism from a Christian vocation. I often say that I would make a better Christian today as a Buddhist. Where to start is a good question. You listed a few elements of Buddhism as you current understand them that do not make a lot of sense to you. Some are incorrect, and some just reflect a lack of understanding. For example the one about no God. Buddhism, nor the Buddha, says/said there is no god. Buddhist thought just says the idea of a god is unknowable. In other words, the idea of the cause of creation is a transcended reality. Buddhism is not atheistic, it is more agnostic. No self is not saying there is no self reality, but the notion of who we really are is not the self you have come to think it is. It is about understanding how we understand Duality. All this represents why we need a teacher especially in the beginning of our study. As to your question of what “Buddhism” to study, has a more complex answere. There is a simple path to begin however. Just work to begin a meditation practice. Just sit. Try to not think so much. Just be aware of your breathing. When a thought comes to mind try to not follow it and return to just being aware of your breathing again. Do not count your breaths because that is thinking too. Try to find a book to study of the Four Noble Truths. Just study this as Everything that Buddhism teaches comes from this perspective. When your ready seek a teacher. Avoid skipping around in your reading of Buddhist text, respecially legacy master in the beginning. This will cause confusion. When you move beyond the Bibical of reality you will begin to see the world around you more clearly. Buddhism is about human flourishing. We each engage it from our unique perspective.

      Shen-Xi Sensei

      • Rico

        Thank you so much. What ONE book would you recommend? There are thousands out there. I have read some, but I would covet your input. Thank you.

  2. Unfortunately there’s not just one book that is both traditional and modern enough for Westerners that speaks in a language that crosses the cultural divide between East and West for beginners, though many try including my book. So, here are a few that might be a good beginning for you. None of these speak from a single tradition or lineage. Their approach is more pragmatic. They are all in print and available from Amazon.

    The Heart Of The Buddha’s Teaching g by Thich Nhat Hahn

    What The Buddha Taught by Walpole Rahula

    Buddhism Without Beliefs by Stephen Batchelor

    Buddhist Philosiphy by David Kalupahana

    DXA

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